Steak House Yeast Rolls

Tanks Giving is fast approaching! I am going to re-post several of the most popular Thanksgiving related posts over the next few days you help you get ready for the big feast!

First up: Steak House Yeast Rolls!

Needing to develop some recipes for a couple of TV shoots coming up, I have been going through a lot of recipes.

This recipe for Steak House Yeast Rolls was a consideration but as I was working through the recipe, the realization that this would be far too complicated to do on Charlotte Cooks, my TV show on PBS in the Charlotte market.

Steak House Yeast Rolls

Steak House Yeast Rolls

With only 26.45 minutes to fill, two 2-hour rising times, mixing, shaping, baking, making a filling for cinnamon rolls, icing, would take an entire season, not 26 minutes.

You have the pleasure of the recipe and variations, my neighbors will enjoy a slab of rolls.

Since I started taking a nutrition class a couple of weeks ago, I have seriously increased the awareness of what I am eating and what is in those lovely morsels I select to stuff in my face.

Making these rolls at home ensures you are using good wholesome ingredients. No dough conditioners, artificial flavors or stabilizers. Just fresh butter, eggs, organic flour, sugar, milk and yeast.

The dough feels great and gives your arms a work out.

  • Servings: ”18″
  • Difficulty: ”medium”
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Original recipe from Martha Stewart

  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1/2 ounce active dry yeast
  • 4 ounces melted butter
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons Kosher salt
  • 6 to 6-1/2 cups of AP flour
  • Extra soft butter to butter the sides of the bowl and baking dish
  • 1 egg for egg wash

Heat the milk and water to 110°F. Whisk the yeast into the heated milk and water. Let sit for 5 minutes, it should become frothy and bubble.

Add the butter, eggs, sugar and salt to a large bowl, whisk in the milk and yeast mixture.

Add the flour one cup at a time, creating a shaggy dough.

This can be done in a mixer with a dough hook but the final kneading will have to be done by hand so you don’t burn out your machine. unless, or course, you have a really heavy-duty mixer. I don’t stress my Kitchen-Aid stand mixer with the final kneading. Initial mixing yes, but not the final knead.

On a lightly floured surface, turn out the dough and knead until it is smooth and elastic. Form it into a nice round ball.

Butter the inside of a large bowl, Roll the dough ball to cover the surface with butter then place the ball in the bottom of the bowl. Cover with plastic wrap that has been also oiled to prevent the rising dough from sticking to the wrap as it rises.

Doubled in Size

Doubled in Size

Allow to rise in a warm place until the dough has doubled in size. This may take 1-1/2 to 2 hours.

Punch down the dough and divide the dough in half.

Roll each dough ball into an even rope

Cut and weigh for even size

Cut and weigh for even size

and cut even size rolls. Weigh each roll to weigh 1.70 ounces. Lightly roll them to shape into balls.

Butter a 9 x 12 baking pan. Place each roll in rows 4 x 6, allowing a small bit of space between each roll. This space will fill in as the rolls rise. Cover with oiled plastic wrap.

Allow to rise again, until doubled in size.

Yeast Rolls ready to bake

Yeast Rolls ready to bake

Once the roll pan is full, you will have some left over dough.

This dough is perfect for some amazing cinnamon rolls!

Roll the dough into a rectangle. Mix some soft butter with some brown sugar and cinnamon to make a paste. ( Make sure it tastes good.)

Spread the butter cinnamon mixture over the rolled out dough. Sprinkle the surface with pecans or walnuts.

Roll the dough into a tight cylinder. Pinch the seam closed.

Using a serrated blade, cut 2″ sliced from the roll. Place them cut side up (and down) in a well-buttered baking pan so the sides barely touch.

Cinnamon Rolls ready to rise

Cinnamon Rolls ready to rise

Ready to bake!

Ready to bake!

Use a pan large enough to fill with the sliced cinnamon rolls.

Allow these to double in size.

Baking yeast rolls and cinnamon rolls:

Pre-heat the oven to 375°F

Mix 1 egg with water to make an egg wash. Brush the surface of the rolls with egg wash just before putting them in the oven.

Bake the rolls for 25-30 minutes, rotating the pan half way through for even baking.

The rolls are done when they are golden brown.

Remove from the oven and allow them to cool for at least 15 minutes before serving.

Any leftovers?

Make bread pudding!

Baked Yeast Rolls

Baked Yeast Rolls

Cinnamon Almond Pistachio Danish Ring

If you think “Cinnamon Almond Pistachio Danish Ring is a mouthful to say, Just wait until you taste it! When I made it, we were lucky to have an event to go to that evening. I sliced it, (ate one, well OK, two; one later though, not two at once ) and took it along to answer phones at the WTVI PBS fundraiser.

DSC_0001To make the dough, I used a yeast raised sweet dough from Peter Reinhart’s book The Bread Baker’s Apprentice. While this dough isn’t as rich as a brioche, it is much easier to handle.

To make the dough you will need:

  • 6 1/2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 5 1/2 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest, fine
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/4 cup whole milk, at room temperature (Do not exceed 100°F or it will kill the yeast)

Cream the sugar, salt and butter together using a paddle attachment, add eggs and lemon zest, whip until smooth.

Add the flour, yeast and milk, mix on low-speed until it forms a ball. Be sure to scrape down the bowl as you work, the dough may stick to the bowl, and there may be “forgotten” flour on the very bottom, scrape it all down and mix together.

Either using a dough hook or by hand, knead the dough until it is smooth and not tacky and sticky. If needed, you may need to use a bit of flour or water during this process.

Coat a bowl with a small bit of oil, place the kneaded dough into the bowl, make sure the dough ball is also covered with a light oil coating to prevent sticking. Cover the bowl with plastic and allow to double in size. Usually this can take up to 2 hours or more, depending upon the warmth of your kitchen.

If you oven has a proofing setting, use it. If you have a gas oven, the pilot light is often enough to maintain about 100°F. If you have an electric oven, turn your oven on the lowest setting for 5 minutes, turn it off and it should be good to go. Check it though as you do not want a hot oven, just slightly warm.

Risen dough about to hit the work bench

Risen dough about to hit the work bench

When the dough has doubled, transfer it to a lightly floured counter and roll it out into a rectangle as best you can.

Adding the cinnamon sugar gives you a couple of options. First you can spread soft butter over the dough and then sprinkle cinnamon sugar over the butter OR you can mix the cinnamon sugar with the butter to make a spread.

This is what I did for this roll.

Mix 1/2 cup of cinnamon sugar with 1/3 cup soft butter. Combine until the mixture is uniform. You can also decide to add additional flavors like ground ginger, cardamom or other ground warm spices.

Spread the cinnamon sugar mixture over the dough, leaving a slight edge for sealing the roll.

Roll into a log

Roll into a log

Starting with the long edge, roll the dough into a large, long log.

Bring the ends of the log together and form a ring.

Bring the ends together to form a ring

Bring the ends together to form a ring

Note: If you want to pre-cut the ring, do it before it rises.

Place the ring on a parchment lined sheet pan. Brush with egg wash and cover with a well oiled piece of plastic wrap.

Allow to double in size.

Pre-heat the oven to 350°F

Egg wash again and sprinkle the surface with sliced almonds and chopped pistachios and sanding sugar if desired.

Sprinkle the top with almonds and pistachios

Sprinkle the top with almonds and pistachios

Bake the ring in the 350°F oven for 30-45 minutes. The internal temperature of the very center of the thickest part of the ring needs to read at least 190°F or else you will end up with raw dough, which isn’t very pleasant.

If the ring is getting too brown before it is done, cover it with either tin foil or parchment.

Remove the baked ring from the oven, place on a rack and allow to cool. Once cool, make a vanilla glaze by combining confectioners sugar with vanilla extract and a bit of milk to drizzle consistency. Drizzle it over the ring, slice and serve.

This is fantastic with a nice cup or coffee or tea. I like to serve it with fresh berries on the side.

Serving the danish ring